21st Century Beatnik
A mix of everything and nothing that makes who I am: a 21st century beatnik. A chaotic vortex of manias, an eccentric political renegade, an art, music, and fashion apassionata (which down to it… its the same thing; art), and an overall box of brick-a-bracks...
21st Century Beatnik
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blackpaint20:

2headedsnake:

Philippe Pasqua‘Crane 6’, 2009
Philippe Pasqua produces vanities in bronze that are then plunged into baths of chrome.

I like how Philippe Pasqua connected the symbolism of the butterfly (pysche, the mind) with that of the skull
blackpaint20:

2headedsnake:

Philippe Pasqua‘Crane 6’, 2009
Philippe Pasqua produces vanities in bronze that are then plunged into baths of chrome.

I like how Philippe Pasqua connected the symbolism of the butterfly (pysche, the mind) with that of the skull
blackpaint20:

2headedsnake:

Philippe Pasqua‘Crane 6’, 2009
Philippe Pasqua produces vanities in bronze that are then plunged into baths of chrome.

I like how Philippe Pasqua connected the symbolism of the butterfly (pysche, the mind) with that of the skull
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guyletatooer:

At Blut & Eisen .
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guyletatooer:

on Stephanie at Blut & Eisen .
Berlin .
guyletatooer:

on Stephanie at Blut & Eisen .
Berlin .
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mexicanfoodporn:

Street Fighter. 
rudestomper:

Mexican Revolucion !
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blackpaint20:

Devious detail from Devil’s Daughter by Margaret Lindsay Williams, 1917
In the early 20th century, the chaste Victorian morality began to give way to a more sexually and socially emancipated vision of femininity. This change was seen as both exciting and perilous and often times the new modern diva would be depicted in front of her vanity in a trompe l’oeil metamorphic scene. These trick of the eye artworks often depicted a skull emerging from within a woman’s reflection as she sat before her vanity, creating a metaphorically fraught double image. The most famous of these was “All is Vanity” by Charles Allan Gilbert. The title and imagery in this work play upon the same anxieties concerning the New 20th century modern woman, but Williams expresses the conflict much more explicitly in “The Devil’s Daughter.” The sitter here is vainly posed with fan, wearing a bat encrusted hat, holding a human skull coyly recoiling from a crucifix that is being menaced from the shadows. It is a fascinating and important take on Romantic modernism and the paradoxes of femininity in the early 20th century, with tremendous fine art and cultural appeal.While not explicitely confirmed, it is widely believed that this painting hung for years in Black Sabbath’s recording studio in London. There is reportedly a companion painting still hanging there - where the woman, repentant, is shown returning from the darkness, embracing the crucifix.
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blackpaint20:

Tim Noble and Sue Webster, Black Narcissus, 2006
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yingyang
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Lolly | Clifford Wun.
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blackpaint20:

Alphonse Mucha - Study for The Death of Saint Adalbert (1893)
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7while23:

Alexi K, Cognitive Polygraph (Woman Disrobing), 2013 (Pen & Ink)
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